Freebie: Identifying Intervals worksheets

Identifying Intervals - iPadBefore I talk about the interval worksheets, I’d like to announce the five winners of the NoteWorks app for iPhone giveaway:

  1. Jane
  2. Lisa
  3. MaryBeth
  4. Laura
  5. Kristina Bowman

Congrats!  Winners, please check your inbox for an email from me.

I have a couple of freebies to share today.

Remember my article about intervalic reading?  As mentioned in that article, my DIY music whiteboard is an oft-used tool when I am working with students to learn to recognize intervals.  

In order for students to learn to recognize intervals on sight (i.e., without “counting” between the notes), it is crucial that students realize that unisons, 3rds, and 5ths are similar in that they each result in a “line-to-line” (a line note going to another line note) or a “space-to-space.”   2nds and 4ths are similar in that they each result in “line-to-space” or “space-to-line.”

To demonstrate this, my student and I draw each interval (unison, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th) starting on a line note and then starting on a space note, to see the line/space patterns that result.

To make my usual interval demonstration quicker/easier, I decided to create the digital worksheet below.  Using my iPad Mini and the GoodNotes app, we can draw on the pdf background just like a whiteboard:

Identifying Intervals - iPad

I created a few different variants of the worksheet you see above.  There is a version that covers only unisons, steps, and skips to use with beginner students.  There are also a few variations to use when students learn 6ths, 7ths, and octaves.

For those of you who do not have an iPad or might wish to use these worksheets during a group class, I have created a print-friendly version.

Identifying Intervals worksheets BW - ColorInMyPiano BW screenshot.png

To download the printable worksheet, visit the Printables > Worksheets page and scroll down to “Identifying Intervals worksheets.”

To download the digital PDF worksheet, visit the Printables > For iPad page and look for “Identifying Intervals worksheets.”

PG
Joy Morin is a piano teacher in Perrysburg, Ohio (United States) who enjoys keeping her teaching fresh with new ideas and resources. ColorInMyPiano.com serves as a journal of her adventures in piano teaching as well as a place to exchange ideas and resources.

Joy has blogged 1119 posts here.

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3 Comments

  1. Posted 15 November 2013 at 7:25 am | Permalink

    Thank you, Joy!

  2. Posted 18 November 2013 at 6:05 pm | Permalink

    Thanks for the great worksheet! I’ve been looking for something to use for intervals. Are you planning on making any other more in depth interval worksheets? ie. learning perfect/major/minor/diminished/augmented intervals

    • Posted 18 November 2013 at 7:26 pm | Permalink

      Hi Brian! I don’t have plans at the moment to make more advanced interval worksheets. I have some other projects on my plate right that I need to focus on right now. But thanks for the idea — perhaps it will be something I will do in the new year!

      Do you ever use the Fundamentals of Piano Theory books with your students? It’s a great series to use – my students really enjoy those worksheets.

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